Over the Fence Urban Farm

Cooperatively farming small patches of Earth in Columbus, OH


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More Stories of Life and Death on Our Little Farm

[Warning: This, like my posts about rabbits and voles, includes discussion and images of dead animals. Vegans beware.]

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Our first flock of hens are nearing the end of their productive egg laying years. As such, we’ve been having lots of conversations around the farm about what comes next, and seeking advice and options for how to make room for a new group of ladies. In the meantime, and after a long cold winter with many days when they didn’t want to leave their sheltered run, I’ve been letting our girls roam around the yard from dusk ’til dawn.

Leaving them out on their own while I’m not in the yard with them has always been risky. We’ve had our share of predatory visitors over the years – hawks, fox, feral cats… But those risks don’t seem worth worrying about much anymore. I figure if their time earth-side is limited one way or another, they should enjoy their days as much as possible.

Still, it was with a heavy heart that I found this old biddy Thursday afternoon. All signs point to death by opossum. The only thing I’m having trouble understanding is the time of day it happened. Right around 3:30 in the afternoon. And so, for the time being, the other ladies are on fairly strict lockdown.

As usual Thompson, our farm dog, found her first. He nudged her with his nose and I joined him to investigate. We have lost chickens before, but all to what seemed like heart attacks or some other internal failure. This was the first time I saw evidence of attack. The first time I saw bloody entrails and flesh resembling what you’d find at the butcher shop. I took a moment to examine the wound, to look at her insides now that they were on the outside. This brought me one step closer in understanding the creatures that have been sharing our yard. Somehow, in death, I felt closer to her and more responsible for her than ever before.

I picked her up without any hesitation and pet her one last time. Then, in keeping with Jewish tradition of burying the dead as soon as possible, I said my own silent blessings of thanks for the time we had with her as Dan, a neighbor, and I buried her.

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Postscript: Shout out to our friends at Two Blocks Away Farm and Foraged and Sown for their support and council during this event.

 

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Field Report: April 6, 2017

It’s been a busy week and getting busier everyday. Here’s a quick look at what’s been happening on the farm.

Chicken run unwrapped! The girls are very happy to have the air flowing again.

…very happy hens.

The work table and area was emptied and out for spring cleaning.

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Unearthed a mouse corpse in the process.

New CSA member John Grimes helped us move one of the two compost bins. One more to go.

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Spring garlic planting experiment…

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.…with help from Mia Grimes.

Transplated radicchio and kale with new CSA member Benn Vaughn.

I planted a green onion vortex.

 

 

 


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Our Little Ladies

Five years ago, I started seriously exploring the possibility of getting a backyard chieckn flock. I was also pregnant and told by my very wise husband that I couldn’t get chickens and a baby in the same year. (I’m sure someone reading this has proved it’s possible, but I think he was right where we were concerned.) Tonight, I’m typing to the mostly sweet sound of our two-week old ladies cheep-cheeping away in the basement.

We got 6 chicks – 2 Buckeyes, 2 Dominiques, and 2 Golden Wyandottes. We chose these breeds for their hardiness, productivity, and variety of feather patterns – I wanted a flock with some visual diversity…

It’s been an amazing two weeks watching them transform from sweet little puff-balls with feet and beaks to the gawky teenagers they are now.

Day one. Undeniably cute and fluffy.

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Feathers coming in…

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Thigh muscles developing…

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And necks stretching.

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It’s been a lot of fun watching them explore the great outdoors,

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And make new friends.

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Looking forward to reporting on their progress another two weeks from now. By then, they might just be living outside!