Over the Fence Urban Farm

Cooperatively farming small patches of Earth in Columbus, OH


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Celebrating Earth Week Columbus with the Kids Garden Club

Members of the Clintonville Farmers’ Market Kids Garden Club came to the farm today to celebrate Earth Week and get the garden ready for the 2018 season.

Here’s a few scenes of the garden before we got started.

One of my goals for the event was to move the fence from the edge of the raised beds to the space beyond them. This will provide the kids a lot more growing space and room to move. With the help of a few handy moms, we got that job done. Now the kids have a bigger space to grow, and the chickens have better boundaries.

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The kids cleared the straw blankets that were sheltering the soil over winter and spread compost all over. Then they played around with the broadfork.

We planted some seeds even though though my go-to garden calendar said it wasn’t a good day for it. We aren’t due to start regular club meetings for a few weeks. I’m hopeful that Persephone will look kindly on our efforts and the kids will have some seedlings to welcome them back.

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In all the excitement of getting to know new garden friends and keep activities moving throughout the evening, we forgot to water. Luckily, shortly after we said our final farewells, it rained. Fingers crossed for more good luck ahead…

Thanks to Trish Clark for suggesting we have a pre-season event as park of Earth Week, and thanks to Green Columbus for sponsoring our activity as part of Earth Week Columbus, “the largest Earth Day volunteer service opportunity in the nation, [planned] in partnership with community leaders, non-profits, and businesses.”

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Food for the Bees

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April 14th we’ve hosting our Second Annual Pollinator Lovers’ Plant Sale & Open House. In addition to making a few bucks for the farm and our friends at Red Oak Community School, we use this sale to share some of what we’ve learned about feeding the bees and butterflies that help feed us by pollinating our plants. This year we’re offering a buffet of perennials and annuals. This post offers a bit of a shopping guide for people who are coming to our sale.

First, I remember when I was first getting into gardening I didn’t know the difference between a perennial and annual. Perennials are plants that come back each spring after a winter of hibernating, annuals need to be replanted each year.

The perennials we’ll be selling – Yarrow, Sedum, Aster, Purple Cone Flower, Chives, Bee Balm, Lavender, Lupine, Camomile, Iris – are mostly drought tolerant. This means you won’t have to water them once they are established in your garden. This is good news for forgetful gardeners and those interested in conserving water.

The annuals we’re selling – Cilantro, Parsley, Calendula, Safflower, Forget-me-Not, Sun Ball, Gilia Globe – include herbs and flowers which provide food for us as well as the bees and other cutting flowers. Generally, annuals need more attention than perennials, including more food and water.

The second important thing to consider when planting for the bees is flower timing. Ideally, you want to have things blooming throughout the season to keep the bees coming to your yard. Here’s an example from spring through fall: Chives –> yarrow –> calendula –> purple coneflower –> bee balm –> sedum –> aster. Use the links above to find combinations that might work for you.

One final note, once bees find a place to feed they like to return, and bring their friends! So placing varieties of plants in groups can help you not only attract the bees, but keep them around. In other words, consider buying more than one plant of each variety you choose and spacing them close together in your garden.

See you at the sale!


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Scenes from the field: 4.2.18

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The sun was shining and The Farmers Almanac Gardening by the Moon Calendar  said it was a good day for transplanting. We were lucky to have friends free to help us move some things around. Here are a few highlights.

A peak under some of our caterpillars. Clockwise from top right – spinach under frost blanket (planted 2/5), potatoes under low plastic tunnel (planted 2/22: Thanks for the inspiration, Milan!), and the view inside our high tunnel panted with various herbs and greens in January).

Homeschool on the farm today included measuring and recording air and soil temperature in 5 different growing situations (high tunnel, low tunnel w/plastic, low tunnel with frost blanket, glass-topped cold-frame, and no cover.)

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The girls potted some plants for our upcoming sale with partial proceeds going to Red Oak Community School.

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Then the moms broke our backs transplanting hundreds of onion, kale, beet, and spinach seedlings. Like I said, it was a very good day.

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More Stories of Life and Death on Our Little Farm

[Warning: This, like my posts about rabbits and voles, includes discussion and images of dead animals. Vegans beware.]

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Our first flock of hens are nearing the end of their productive egg laying years. As such, we’ve been having lots of conversations around the farm about what comes next, and seeking advice and options for how to make room for a new group of ladies. In the meantime, and after a long cold winter with many days when they didn’t want to leave their sheltered run, I’ve been letting our girls roam around the yard from dusk ’til dawn.

Leaving them out on their own while I’m not in the yard with them has always been risky. We’ve had our share of predatory visitors over the years – hawks, fox, feral cats… But those risks don’t seem worth worrying about much anymore. I figure if their time earth-side is limited one way or another, they should enjoy their days as much as possible.

Still, it was with a heavy heart that I found this old biddy Thursday afternoon. All signs point to death by opossum. The only thing I’m having trouble understanding is the time of day it happened. Right around 3:30 in the afternoon. And so, for the time being, the other ladies are on fairly strict lockdown.

As usual Thompson, our farm dog, found her first. He nudged her with his nose and I joined him to investigate. We have lost chickens before, but all to what seemed like heart attacks or some other internal failure. This was the first time I saw evidence of attack. The first time I saw bloody entrails and flesh resembling what you’d find at the butcher shop. I took a moment to examine the wound, to look at her insides now that they were on the outside. This brought me one step closer in understanding the creatures that have been sharing our yard. Somehow, in death, I felt closer to her and more responsible for her than ever before.

I picked her up without any hesitation and pet her one last time. Then, in keeping with Jewish tradition of burying the dead as soon as possible, I said my own silent blessings of thanks for the time we had with her as Dan, a neighbor, and I buried her.

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Postscript: Shout out to our friends at Two Blocks Away Farm and Foraged and Sown for their support and council during this event.

 


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Follow-up on The Columbus Dispatch Home and Garden Show

Last week I was offered tickets to attend the Home and Garden Show and to give tickets away to readers of this blog. (To see my original giveaway post, click here.)  Thanks to all who left comments. I’m excited to hear how your plans and commitments to local food systems progress this season! In this addendum, I wanted to share my brief review of the show based on my experience attending this past Monday with some friends of the farm and our children.

In a nutshell: 
Chances are, if you are reading this blog you shouldn’t go to the home and garden show.

I should have predicted this based on the show’s sponsors, but I like to think of myself as someone who’ll try anything once. In short, this is a trade show not befitting DIY homsteaders or urban farmers. It’s a place for people to find others to build and plant things for them and there was little to no mention of sustainable gardening practices, planting with native species, or growing fruits and vegetables. So do yourself a favor, and stay home and get to work!

All that said, if you enjoy visiting conservatories, you’ll appreciate the picturebook-themed garden installations at the show this year. I can appreciate the effort the nurseries and landscapers put toward bringing these spaces to life inside the Ohio Expo Center.

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The Lorax garden installation. Mildly amusing, but not really useful as urban farming inspiration.

In the meantime, my friends and I will be dreaming up plans for a home and garden show befitting our kind. A good place to start would be visiting any number of farms and homesteads, like ours, that host open houses throughout the growing season. Stay tuned for updates on our 2018 open houses and Ohio-based events hosted by Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA) and OSU Extension.


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Columbus Home & Garden Show Giveaway!

The Columbus Dispatch sent me tickets give to readers for the 2018 Home and Garden Show (February 17-25 at the Ohio Expo Center). I haven’t been to the show before but there are some interesting events planned. I’ll plan on attending with some farm friends February 19th when the Columbus Metropolitan Library is on site for some special presentations. And I will be sure to share what I see and learn, here and on our Facebook page.

If you would like a pair (2) of tickets, leave a comment below sharing something new you plan to do in 2018 to connect you the local food system. Are you adding something new to your own food garden, joining a CSA (you can read about ours here), buying local meats and honey…

I select two winners at random on February 16th and arrange for ticket pick-up.

Looking forward to hearing all your plans!


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Top 40 Urban Gardening Blogs on the Planet

Groucho Marx famously declared he didn’t want to belong to any club that would have him as a member. In similar fashion, I’m not usually one for superlatives and am uncomfortable with praise, but every once in awhile it’s nice to be validated.

So, today we share the news that we were included Feedspot’s list of the 40 best blogs on the web about urban gardening. (We’ve made similar lists in the past. See, for example, 10 Urban Agriculture Projects Making a Difference in Columbus, OH).

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I appreciate Feedspot’s metrics and they give us some idea of what we’ve done well in the past with regard to sharing our work in the field with folks online. I know people around the world are reading about us through this blog and I hope we are inspiring others as we were inspired by our mentors (here in Columbus, across the country, and around the world.  The metrics (see blow) also serve as a reminder of what we need to do to keep our momentum going.

  • Google reputation and Google search ranking
  • Influence and popularity on Facebook, twitter and other social media sites
  • Quality and consistency of posts.
  • Feedspot’s editorial team and expert review

I promise to keep posting to this space and hope you will keep reading!